Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson, right, gives a statement at the Parliament regarding the Panama papers released yesterday, in Reykjavik on Monday April 4, 2016. Iceland's prime minister insisted Monday he would not resign after documents leaked in a media investigation allegedly link him to an offshore company that could represent a serious conflict of interest, according to information leaked from a Panamanian law firm at the center of an international tax evasion scheme. AP/Brynjar Gunnarsson

People demonstrate against Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur Gunnlaugsson in Reykjavik, Iceland on April 4, 2016 after a leak of documents by so-called Panama Papers stoked anger over his wife owning a tax haven-based company with large claims on the country's collapsed banks. The leaked documents have sparked a media investigation of possible links to an offshore company that could represent a serious conflict of interest. REUTERS/Stigtryggur Johannsson

People demonstrate against Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur Gunnlaugsson in Reykjavik, Iceland on April 4, 2016 after a leak of documents by so-called Panama Papers stoked anger over his wife owning a tax haven-based company with large claims on the country's collapsed banks. Iceland's prime minister told parliament Monday he will not resign even as thousands of angry protesters demanded he step down and call new elections because of leaked documents that raised questions about his financial affairs. REUTERS/Stigtryggur Johannsson

The Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson, centre, stands at the lectern to give a statement at the Parliament regarding the Panama papers released yesterday, in Reykjavik on Monday April 4, 2016. Iceland's prime minister insisted Monday he would not resign after documents leaked in a media investigation allegedly link him to an offshore company that could represent a serious conflict of interest, according to information leaked from a Panamanian law firm at the center of an international tax evasion scheme. AP/Brynjar Gunnarsson

People demonstrate against Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur Gunnlaugsson in Reykjavik, Iceland on April 4, 2016 after a leak of documents by so-called Panama Papers stoked anger over his wife owning a tax haven-based company with large claims on the country's collapsed banks. REUTERS/Stigtryggur Johannsson

People demonstrate against Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur Gunnlaugsson in Reykjavik, Iceland on April 4, 2016 after a leak of documents by so-called Panama Papers stoked anger over his wife owning a tax haven-based company with large claims on the country's collapsed banks. REUTERS/Stigtryggur Johannsson


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