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The Traditional Village of Takpala Alor
Lasiana Beach, Kupang, East Nusa Tenggara (NTT). Tempo/Jhon Seo
Sunday, 01 September, 2013 | 17:00 WIB
The Traditional Village of Takpala Alor

TEMPO.CO, Kupang - Alor district, East Nusa Tenggara (NTT), is known for its fascinating view of the sea that is used as a diving site for tourists from across the globe. Aside from that, the region is also home to Takpala village, a traditional village to the south of Alor Island.

Takpala village is a traditional village located on the top of a mountain, only half an hour (around 30 km) from Kalabahi, the capital of Alor district. From above, tourists can enjoy the cool breeze and an incredible view of Takpala Bay.

In this unique traditional village resides the Abui tribe, an ethnic group that lives off the fruits of the forest located behind the village. 

This Takpala village consists of 15 traditional Abui homes called rumah lopo. Thirteen of these homes, called kolwat, have no walls. The other two are, called kanuarwat by the locals, and only certain people are allowed to enter.

Takpapal is one of Alor district’s tourist destinations often visited by travelers.

Martinbus Kafekae, 42, who is one of the village chiefs, said the Abui people only rely on the forest to fulfill their daily needs, such as gathering grains and seeds to create souvenirs and sell them to tourists.

Tourists adore the handicraft made by the Abui tribe because of their unique shapes and materials derived from the forest.

Iwan Manasa, a tourist visiting the village, urged the government to continue to preserve the culture of the Abui people in Takpala village. He hopes the local administration will promote this village overseas; a village that still holds true to its traditions and identity.

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