Saturday, 19 January 2019

Indonesian Police DVI Team Receives 195 Body Bags

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  • Rescue team members carry the remains of passengers of Lion Air's flight JT610 at Tanjung Priok port in Jakarta, Indonesia, November 1, 2018. REUTERS/Beawiharta

    Rescue team members carry the remains of passengers of Lion Air's flight JT610 at Tanjung Priok port in Jakarta, Indonesia, November 1, 2018. REUTERS/Beawiharta

    TEMPO.CO, JakartaRaden Said Sukanto National Police Hospital's Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) team members received 195 bags containing body parts of victims of Lion Air flight JT 610 that crashed into the Java Sea on Oct 29. Head of the National Police DVI team Sen. Coms. Lisda Cancer stated here on Saturday that her team members were able to identify 77 victims of the plane crash comprising 57 men and 20 women.

    "Today, there will be victims, who could have been identified," she noted, adding that her team members had received data on 256 antemortem samples, of which 189 were verified.

    The Lion Air flight JT 610 crashed into the Java Sea off Tanjung Karawang, West Java, 13 minutes after taking off from Cengkareng's Soekarno-Hatta International Airport at 6:20 a.m. local time on its way to Pangkalpinang on Monday (Oct 29). The Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, carrying 189 people on board, reportedly lost contact at 6:33 a.m. local time.

    In connection with the related authorities' endeavor to unearth the causes of the Lion Air plane crash, Indonesian divers had succeeded in finding the ill-fated Lion Air plane's flight data recorder, or the plane's first black box, on Nov 1.

    In another development, the National Search and Rescue Agency (Basarnas) had extended the period of evacuation operation to help find the remaining bodies of the victims and the cockpit voice recorder, or the other black box.

    In response to this fatal accident, Vice President Jusuf Kalla said the government will consider the proposed formation of an aviation court. An Aviation Court is similar to a Shipping Court, which tries skippers over negligence while carrying out their professional duties, thereby leading to casualties.

    ANTARA